Video Q&A with Jeremy Gardiner of the Head Covering Movement

This is exciting–we have the chance to ask Jeremy Gardiner of the Head Covering Movement website our questions about headcovering! Here’s how he explains it:

(Headcovering Q&A intro video link)

As you can see, I’ve already recorded my own question for him. So far, mine is the second question he’s gotten, but he needs more questions from more people in order for this new series to be a success! If you have a headcovering question (mine isn’t technically about headcovering–it’s about our natural covering, the hair), don’t be shy–go ahead and record it, and send it on over! I can’t wait to see the final presentation.

(My question for the Q&A video link)

(Oops, I just realized it’s more than 30 seconds! Oh, well…)

Thanks so much for participating! And, if you want to have a go at answering the question I posed, it would be neat to read what you think in the comment section below. I’d love to hear your perspective! Have a great week, everybody!

~Jessica

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3 thoughts on “Video Q&A with Jeremy Gardiner of the Head Covering Movement

  1. Jessica, I have just come across your blog after seeing one of your YouTube videos. I am going to do my own in depth study of 1 Corinthians 11 as you have me really thinking about covering my head. I used to do it a few years ago, but got away from it as I was the only one in my church and (what seemed like) the whole town. Anyway, I am curious to know what you consider to be a head covering. My husbands Mom is the only one I know who covers and hers is a small kerchief type one. When her daughters were growing up, they all wore headbands that were about 3 inches wide. I bring this up because, to me, a head covering should cover the head…like the whole head. That would be more like the long scarves. Am I wrong? Is a small headband enough?

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    • If I can add my personal perspective on this. As a traditionalist Catholic I veil for Mass and all private prayer. It is something which I feel very strongly about doing and which my husband would frankly insist on even if I didn’t. .

      For this I wear mantilla style veils which are at least intended to cover my hair pretty much completely.

      My personal conviction, which my husband also supports but which is less a traditional requirement of the Church is that we should cover at all times. But out of deference to not wanting to ‘stand out’ I generally wear more of a hair band or similar which only partially covers my hair – I work on the idea that it is more symbolic than an actual covering.

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    • Dear Mariel,
      Thank you for commenting on my blog! I’m so glad to hear that you are going to study 1 Cor. 11 in depth. I think that when you do so, you will find the answer to your own question.

      The Greek meaning of the word for being covered is more closely linked to something like a veil that covers the whole head (as you mentioned).

      [From Strong’s Concordance: G2619 (both instances of the word “covered” in 1 Cor. 11:6), katakalypto: to cover wholly, i.e. veil:–cover, hide.]

      Personally, I don’t ever use wide headbands, even though I did buy a couple when I was first starting out; I use triangular scarves, infinity scarves, and rectangular scarves. I keep the triangular scarves in place with snap clips; but, the infinity and rectangular scarves I simply drape over my head loosely. My husband does not believe a headband is a sufficient covering.

      However, I demonstrate it in one of my videos as an option for those starting out. It may help some people make the transition from never covering to starting to cover. And, it could be an option for younger girls with smaller heads (the headband covers more of the head), and for full-time coverers who need a solution for covering during more strenuous physical activity (it might stay put better, and not be so hot).

      Thanks for your question!
      Jessica

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